Anaglyph 3D Method

To explore the creation of 3D images, I worked with the Anaglyph 3D method for creating images as opposed to the traditional stereoscopic method as I felt it gave more diversity to my work, but still represented the alliance of the eyes and the brain through the perception of 3D using the development of new technology. Anaglyph 3D images work by encoding each eye using filters (in this method I used chromatically opposite colours – cyan and red – on colour images (from my original colour work).

When viewed through 3D glasses (which have “color coded”lenses) each of the two images reaches one eye, revealing an integrated stereoscopic image. The visual cortex of the brain fuses this into perception of a three dimensional scene or composition.

I chose to use mostly my original colour images to demonstrate how the eye-to-brain relationship can be manipulated to decode the same image in an entirely new way (developing from 2D to 3D) and continue the exploration of the alliance of the eyes and the brain through visual representation.

I felt the images work strongly as a series positioned in a grid formation as due to the hazy 3D border around the corner of the image, it becomes increasingly harder as the viewer to differentiate between each image the longer they are viewed, creating almost 1 3D image made up of 18 separate photographs. The colour the tones within the images also ‘blend’ as the cyan and red diffuse the original colour, so each becomes part of the set as they all features the same tones. The heavy black borders above and below each image also add a layer of contrast and definition to the images and are similar to the layout of the original colour images shown in the galleries for each colour / day of the week. As the original photographs were linked so strongly to the representation of religion and the Gods and the same images are now manipulated by a scientific process, an extreme contrast is created

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: