Amblyopia / Duane Michals (Artist Research)

“It is no accident that you are reading this. I am making black marks on white paper. These marks are my thoughts, and although I do not know who you are reading this now, in some way the lines of our lives have intersected… For the length of these few sentences, we meet here. It is no accident that you are reading this. This moment has been waiting for you, I have been waiting for you. Remember me.” – – Duane Michals


The positioning of words aside an image is a powerful technique in manipulating how the viewer interprets the image.  I found the layout of my days of the week colour images (image with explaining text below) gave the image a sense of depth and the use of text can work to enhance images, in a similar way to a ‘visual aid’. This ties in well with my exploration of visual deficiencies and the alliance of the eyes and the brain; often ‘visual aids’ (picture cards with texts to explain beneath) to enhance the abilities of those whose sight is effected by deficiencies such as Amblyopia.

Amblyopia: a disorder of the visual system that is characterized by a vision deficiency in an eye that is otherwise physically normal, or out of proportion to associated structural abnormalities of the eye. Amblyopia means that visual stimulation either fails to transmit or is poorly transmitted through the optic nerve to the brain for a continuous period of time, resulting in poor or blurry vision. 

To combine the use of text with images as a ‘visual aid’ and to enhance the depth of images, I have explored layering and blending text that explains or has a connection to the image on the abstract colour images. As the images are abstract, the ‘explanation’ works effectively as the viewer may not have been able to comprehend the subject of the image without the aid of text. I have chosen text that has a scientific nature (such as names of flowers) as I would like to continue exploring the link between science and the production of sight. [ABOVE]

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